Studying in Canada: Experiences of Female Graduate Students from Saudi Arabia

  • Bushra Alqudayri University of Victoria, Canada
  • Tatiana Gounko University of Victoria, Canada
Keywords: Canadian universities, gender segregation, international students, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

This paper presents findings from a study which explored experiences of Saudi Arabian female graduate students studying in Canada. The data for this descriptive qualitative study was collected through semi-structured interviews with ten students undertaking graduate studies in universities across 5 Canadian provinces. The findings of this study suggest that female graduate students from Saudi Arabia face unique challenges related to adaptation to a new education environment and to managing cultural expectations of Saudi and Canadian communities. Studying and living in Canada affected our participants’ personal values and changed the way they viewed themselves, their culture and community.

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Author Biographies

Bushra Alqudayri, University of Victoria, Canada

BUSHRA ALQUDYARI, MEd, completed her master’s degree in the Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies, University of Victoria, Canada. She is currently working at the Victoria Immigrant and Refugee Centre Society in British Columbia, Canada. 

Tatiana Gounko, University of Victoria, Canada

TATIANA GOUNKO, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies, University of Victoria, Canada. Her major research interests lie in the area of international and comparative higher education, policy and reform.

Published
2018-10-01
How to Cite
Alqudayri, B., & Gounko, T. (2018). Studying in Canada: Experiences of Female Graduate Students from Saudi Arabia. Journal of International Students, 8(4), 1736–1747. Retrieved from https://www.ojed.org/index.php/jis/article/view/228
Section
Research Articles