The Culture of Hospitality in Moldova and the United States

Authors

  • Anastasiia Dobrovolska Troy University, United States
  • Rolf Holtz Troy University, United States

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v3i1.519

Abstract

This tongue-in-cheek comparison between the unplanned visit and invasion by Mongolian-Tatarian tribes signifies at least two aspects of Moldovan hospitality. First, the treatment of guests in one’s home follows a cultural norm that prescribes not only the attitude toward visitors, but also the protocol of a host’s behavior. Moldovan rules of hospitality provide hosts with guidelines for proper comportment during a visit. Second, the adage suggests that guests can expect their host to adhere to a traditional standard of hospitable conduct. This helps to eliminate the uncertainty guests might experience in someone else’s home and alerts them to the efforts their host exerts on their behalf. In the United States, hospitality is also highly valued. However, norms for a host’s conduct are likely to range widely given the many cultures that shape American society. 

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Author Biographies

Anastasiia Dobrovolska, Troy University, United States

Anastasiia Dobrovolska is a senior medical student at Transnistrian State University, Moldova. Anastasiia won a full scholarship in the field of Psychology through the Global Undergraduate Exchange Program in Eurasia and Central Asia 2011-2012, sponsored by The US Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs to study at Troy University, Alabama. Her interests are working with youth, psychology, medicine, studying foreign languages, and participation in international student conferences and festivals. She plans to work as a pediatrician after graduation from medical school.

Rolf Holtz, Troy University, United States

Rolf Holtz is an associate professor at Troy university. He received his PhD in social psychology from the University of Southern California. Currently, his research focuses on links between collectivism, and social and academic motivations. He has also conducted work in Aceh, Indonesia, on the impact of civil war and cultural orientation on authoritarianism. 

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Published

2013-01-01

How to Cite

Dobrovolska, A., & Holtz, R. (2013). The Culture of Hospitality in Moldova and the United States. Journal of International Students, 3(1), 61–63. https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v3i1.519

Issue

Section

Study Abroad Reflections