Chinese International Student Sexual Harassment on U.S. College Campuses

Authors

  • Yunling Chang Texas A&M University, USA
  • Sakina Ali Texas A & M University, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7609-1306
  • Ankita Sahu Texas A&M University, USA
  • Sidai Dong Texas A&M University, USA
  • Carly W. Thornhill Texas A&M University, USA
  • Polet Milian Texas A&M University, USA
  • Linda G. Castillo Texas A&M University, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7634-7973

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v11i3.2678

Keywords:

higher education, international students, sexual harassment

Abstract

The #MeToo movement has brought the issue of sexual harassment to U.S. college campuses. Most scholarly work in this area focuses on White American women with little information on international student experiences. Because sexual harassment is considered hush-hush (shi) and taboo, many Chinese international students may not question harassment behaviors they experience. For many Chinese women attending a U.S. university, their first public discussion may occur during student orientation. Thus, students come to college campuses with varying levels of awareness of sexual harassment. Given the growing number of Chinese international students, the purpose of this article is to provide an overview of their experiences and perceptions of sexual harassment. The article provides recommendations for university personnel working with international students.

Author Biographies

Yunling Chang, Texas A&M University, USA

Yunling Chang, M.S., is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University and Psychology Intern at Texas A&M Counseling & Psychological Services. Her major research interests lie in the area of international student population and trauma (particularly sexual and racial).

Sakina Ali, Texas A & M University, USA

Sakina F. Ali, M.Ed. is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University. Their major research interests include examining the impact of religion/spirituality, patriarchal ideologies, and acculturative stress on mental health outcomes for marginalized populations – specifically South Asian Americans and LGBTQ+ people.

Ankita Sahu, Texas A&M University, USA

Ankita Sahu, M.Ed. is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University. Her research interests focus on multicultural counseling training and supervision. 

Sidai Dong, Texas A&M University, USA

Sidai Dong, M.A., M. Ed. is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University and a Psychology Intern at Texas A&M Counseling & Psychological Services. Her research interests focus on understanding the intersections among cognitive, behavioral, emotional development, and mental health outcomes for emerging adults, people with disabilities, and their caregivers.

Carly W. Thornhill, Texas A&M University, USA

Carly W. Thornhill, M.Ed., is a second-year doctoral student in the Department of Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University. Her research interests focus on the areas of sexual assault, the attainment of higher education, and multiculturalism.

Polet Milian, Texas A&M University, USA

Polet M. Milian (she/her), M.S.Ed, is a second year doctoral student in the Department of Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University. Her research interests focus broadly on multicultural psychology. Specifically, on the areas of Latinx persistence and mental health particularly amongst immigrant populations.

Linda G. Castillo, Texas A&M University, USA

Linda G. Castillo, PhD., is a Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University. Her expertise and research focuses on Latina educational persistence and mental health and scale development of cultural constructs.

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Published

2021-06-15

How to Cite

Chang, Y., Ali, S., Sahu, A., Dong, S., Thornhill, C. W., Milian, P., & Castillo, L. G. (2021). Chinese International Student Sexual Harassment on U.S. College Campuses. Journal of International Students, 11(3), 742–748. https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v11i3.2678

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Section

Research in Briefs (English)