First Time International College Students’ Level of Anxiety in Relationship to Awareness of Their Learning-Style Preferences

Authors

  • Arlene Shorter Young Centenary College, United States

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v1i2.552

Abstract

Given the receptivity of American colleges to international students, administrators and professors must recognize the diversity such registrants bring to campus in the form of achievement, age, gender, language, and national differences. The purpose of this study was to compare learning style preferences of international first year college students and to analyze the effects of accommodating learning-style preferences of first year international college students on achievement and anxiety levels over one semester. This paper focused on the identification of learning style profiles of first time visiting Japanese, Korean, and Chinese college student populations. It assessed anxiety and acculturation levels of these international students when they were first introduced to the American educational system which incorporated teacher facilitation and promoted student directed studies. Finally, student learning styles were assessed after a six-week summer session to see if learning styles remained the same after students were introduced to the American educational system. 

Author Biography

Arlene Shorter Young, Centenary College, United States

Dr. Young received her Bachelor of Arts in English and Master of Arts in Education: Instructional Leadership from Centenary College, NJ (1996 & 1999). She received a Certification in English as a Second Language instruction from Fairleigh Dickenson University, NJ in 1998. Dr. Young received her Doctor of Education Degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Downloads

Published

2011-07-01

How to Cite

Young, A. S. (2011). First Time International College Students’ Level of Anxiety in Relationship to Awareness of Their Learning-Style Preferences. Journal of International Students, 1(2), 43–49. https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v1i2.552

Issue

Section

Research Articles