Available but Not Approachable: Black Business Students’ Interactions with Faculty at a Historically White Institution

Authors

  • Monica E Allen North Carolina A&T State University, USA
  • Sandra L. Dika University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32674/jump.v4i2.2581

Keywords:

Academic persistence, Black/African American students, Critical Race Theory, student-faculty interactions

Abstract

Persistent racial inequities in educational attainment and employment negatively affect the economic mobility of the Black population in the United States. Among college graduates, Black people are underrepresented in most high-paying college majors, except for business. In this phenomenological study framed by Critical Race Theory, Black business students (n=10) at a Historically White Institution shared their perceptions of the climate and experiences of interactions with faculty. Students reported they often felt unwelcome and othered in the White-dominated space and received limited support from White faculty that were frequently “available but not approachable”. Future research and practice should focus on institutional strategies to address racism by developing an equitable and welcoming business school culture and fostering cultural competence of faculty.

 

 

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Author Biographies

Monica E Allen, North Carolina A&T State University, USA

MONICA E. ALLEN, Ed.D., is an Assistant Professor of Leadership Studies in the Department of Leadership Studies and Adult Education at North Carolina A&T State University.  Her research agenda centers on the themes of equity, inclusion, student academic success, and student persistence for marginalized groups in higher education.  Email: meallen1@ncat.edu

Sandra L. Dika, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA

SANDRA L. DIKA, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation in the Department of Educational Leadership at UNC Charlotte.  Her research agenda centers on the themes of equity, access, engagement, and persistence for marginalized and minoritized groups in higher education.  Email: sdika@uncc.edu

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Published

2020-12-09