Physical Self-Schema Acceptance and Perceived Severity of Online Aggressiveness in Cyberbullying Incidents

  • Alina Roman Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania
  • Dana Rad Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6754-3585
  • Anca Egerau Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania
  • Daniel Dixon Asociación Cultural Social y Educativa Segundas Oportunidades, Spain
  • Tiberiu Dughi Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania
  • Gabriela Kelemen Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania
  • Evelina Balas Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania
  • Gavril Rad Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania
Keywords: cyberbullying, physical self-schema, perceived severity of online aggressiveness, dynamic relationship

Abstract

 In this study, physical self-schema referred to the perceived body image youths have over their physical appearance. There is a pool of research that links the perceived physical self-schema to perceived severity of online aggressiveness. This research suggests that the better the physical self-schema perception is, the least youth consider the severity of online aggressiveness towards peers. The project KYSFC was developed to provide an in-depth understanding of the interactions between different psychological aspects of cyberbullying in adolescents. Using a two item online questionnaire, the study analyzed the effect of physical self-schema acceptance on perceived severity of online aggressiveness in cyberbullying.  Five hundred and seven students from Belgium, Spain, Romania, and Turkey participated in the survey. When mapping effects of physical self-schema acceptance on perceived negative effect of online aggressiveness, the curvilinear interaction model (2%) is more robust that the linear interaction model (0.8%), when both models are statistically significant.  

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Author Biographies

Alina Roman, Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania

ALINA ROMAN, Ph.D., is Professor hab. in Educational Sciences. She holds a Ph.D. in Educational Sciences. She was a research scientist in more than 10 EU funded projects. Her research interests include Integrated Pedagogy, Didactics, Evaluation. She is the Dean of the Faculty of Educational Sciences, Psychology, and Social Sciences. Email: romanalinafelicia@yahoo.com

Dana Rad, Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania

DANA RAD, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Educational Sciences, Psychology and Social Sciences at the Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania. She holds a double specialization in Psychology (Ph.D. in Cognitive Applied Psychology) and Automation (MD in Automation and Intelligent Systems). She was a Visiting Professor at Instituto Superior Miguel Torga in Coimbra and Instituto Politecnico Portalegre, Portugal, and at the University of Oviedo, Spain, and research scientist in more than 20 European Union-funded projects. As a direct output of the implementation of such initiative, there have been developed career counseling procedures for any type of beneficiary, with a special focus on NEETs, training courses, curricula and Workshops in the field of career counseling and lately in fighting against online hate speech and analyzing the negative psychological effects of online narratives on youth mental health. There have been also organized International Conferences focused on disseminating project’s results and initiate discussions with other relevant experts in the field. Common resources were published in Career counseling strategies - a practical Handbook and Keeping Youth Safe from Cyberbullying – a practical Handbook. She is a member of the editorial review board of 13 International Journals. Her research interests include Cognitive Applied Sciences, Organizational Psychology, Fuzzy logic, Nonlinear Dynamics, Hate Speech, Digital Wellbeing, etc. She is a co-author of 16 books and 70 international conferences and journal papers. She is a member of IANLP, IACAT, IAENG, and APA. Email: dana@xhouse.ro

Anca Egerau, Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania

ANCA EGERAU, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in Pedagogy. She holds a Ph.D. in Educational Sciences. She was a research scientist in 3 EU funded projects. Her research interests include Early Education, Pedagogy, Didactics, non-formal Education. She is the Head of the Department of the Faculty of Educational Sciences, Psychology and Social Sciences. Email: anca_petroi@yahoo.com

Daniel Dixon, Asociación Cultural Social y Educativa Segundas Oportunidades, Spain

DANIEL DIXON has been the president of A.C.S.E.S.O since its founding and is a professional trainer, language teacher, and coach, supporting many people over the years. Daniel has a wealth of experience working for local government in the UK in the fields of education, training, and social services. He is in charge of the activities of the association and he is helping to develop international activities to increase opportunities for the people that we support. He has been working with the community in Gran Canaria for many years organizing events, workshops, and courses. Daniel is involved in entrepreneurship, education, and capacity building for the local community. He speaks English and Spanish. For A.C.S.E.S.O, Daniel is responsible for writing and overseeing EU projects in the fields of youth, adult education, and social inclusion. Email: daniel.dixon@acseso.org

Tiberiu Dughi, Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania

TIBERIU DUGHI, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Educational Sciences, Psychology, and Social Sciences at the Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania. He holds a specialization in Psychology (Ph.D.) and Socio-psychology of the family (MD). He was a Visiting Professor at Instituto Superior Miguel Torga in Coimbra and research scientist in more than 10 European Union-funded projects. He was an educational expert in 4 projects financed by the Education Ministry. His research interests include Educational Psychology, Personality Psychology, Vocational Counseling, Career Development, etc. He is co-author of 10 books and 48 international conferences and journal papers. He is a member of APA, COPSI, and Psychologist Association from Belgique. Email: tibi_dughi@yahoo.com

Gabriela Kelemen, Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania

GABRIELA KELEMEN, Ph.D., is Professor in Pedagogy. She holds a Ph.D. in Educational Sciences. She was a research scientist in more than 10 EU funded projects. Her research interests include Early Education, Educational Psychology, Gifted children, and Special Education. She is the Editor in Chief of Journal Plus Education. Email: gabrielakelemenuav@gmail.com

Evelina Balas, Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania

EVELINA BALAS, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in Pedagogy. She holds a Ph.D. in Educational Sciences. She was a research scientist in 4 EU funded projects. Her research interests include Pedagogy, Didactics, non-formal Education. Email: evelinabalas@yahoo.com

Gavril Rad, Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania

GAVRIL RAD, MD is a psychologist, alumni of Faculty of Educational Sciences, Psychology and Social Sciences, at Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, Romania. His research interest includes digital wellbeing and military psychology. He is a co-author of 10 international conferences and journal papers. Email: radgavrilarad@gmail.com

 

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Published
2020-04-29
How to Cite
Roman, A., Rad, D., Egerau, A., Dixon, D., Dughi, T., Kelemen, G., Balas, E., & Rad, G. (2020). Physical Self-Schema Acceptance and Perceived Severity of Online Aggressiveness in Cyberbullying Incidents. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Education, 9(1), 100-116. https://doi.org/10.32674/jise.v9i1.1961