Value Creating Education Philosophy and the Womanist Discourses of African American Women Educators

Soka Education and Womanist Education Philosophy

Authors

  • Paula Estrada Jones DePaul University, USA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32674/jise.v9iSI.1865

Keywords:

Daisaku Ikeda, Womanist education philosophy, Value Creation Education, Maternal Caring

Abstract

The paper documents the initiative of two African American women educators who have utilized these theoretical approaches to solve the educational challenges in their respective communities. Marva Collins and Corla Hawkins decided to build schools in their own communities after realizing that the public schools were not equipped to educate minorities. The story of these two women demonstrates that individuals can address systemic injustices in their communities. Collins and Hawkins were not wealthy. What they possessed was a passion for helping others. Their example can inspire more individuals to take steps using liberating philosophies, like value-creating education and womanist approaches in education, to transform the state of education in their communities.

 

 

 

 

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Author Biography

Paula Estrada Jones, DePaul University, USA

Paula Estrada Jones is an artist educator. Her interests include new methods to evaluate shared histories, and Identities. Currently, she is pursuing a doctorate in Curriculum Studies at the College of Education, DePaul University, USA. Email: pestr10244@aol.com

References

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Additional Files

Published

2020-07-16

How to Cite

Estrada Jones, P. (2020). Value Creating Education Philosophy and the Womanist Discourses of African American Women Educators: Soka Education and Womanist Education Philosophy. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Education, 9(SI), 102–113. https://doi.org/10.32674/jise.v9iSI.1865

Issue

Section

Special Issue: Soka Approaches in Education