“But I Learn More Bad Grammars When I Write to My Classmates”: Acquiring Academic Literacies in a Multicultural Writing Class

  • Teresa Chen California State University, United States
Keywords: Academic adjustment, Communicative language teaching, Culture, Intercultural communication

Abstract

This qualitative case study sought to understand the experiences of international college students who were involved in the acquisition of academic literacies (via an English-as-a-Second-Language writing class). Data sources included observation field notes; messages posted in an online discussion forum; transcripts of interviews with five focal students and their instructor; and student-level reflective journal entries. Findings were validated via the triangulation of multiple data sources. Several themes emerged from the analyses that are associated with academic adjustment and intercultural communication, including an energetic class that highly valued participation, conflicting student views on participation, and unvalued collaboration. Implications included the provision of instructionrelated opportunities that enable students to explore the cultures and culturally diverse communication styles of their academic peers

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Author Biography

Teresa Chen, California State University, United States

Teresa Chen, PhD, serves as Associate Professor in the Department of Advanced Studies in Education and Counseling at California State University, Long Beach. Her research interests include academic literacies and computer-assisted language learning.

Published
2018-04-01
How to Cite
Chen, T. (2018). “But I Learn More Bad Grammars When I Write to My Classmates”: Acquiring Academic Literacies in a Multicultural Writing Class. Journal of International Students, 8(2), 638-658. https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v8i2.96
Section
Research Articles