Negative Racial Encounters and Academic Outcomes of International and Domestic Students in Four Canadian Universities

Authors

  • J. Paul Grayson York University, Canada

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v4i3.466

Keywords:

international students, domestic students, discrimination, educational outcomes, Canada

Abstract

In Canada, there has been little systematic inquiry into the nature and extent of discrimination against university students and the potential impact of discrimination on educational outcomes. On the basis of an examination of domestic and international students at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver), York (Toronto), McGill (Montreal), and Dalhousie (Halifax), it is argued that with the exception of employment of Chinese origin and Black students, in general, students experience little discrimination on- and off-campus; that the discrimination confronted by students does not systematically correspond to their minority non-minority status; and that discrimination is of little consequence for grade point average and program satisfaction.

Author Biography

J. Paul Grayson, York University, Canada

Paul Grayson is a professor of sociology at York University in Toronto Canada. His research has focused on the outcomes of the university experience for students of both sexes, of different classes, and of different ethno-racial origins. Currently, he is examining the experiences and outcomes of students in the 1960s. 

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Published

2014-07-01

How to Cite

Grayson, J. P. (2014). Negative Racial Encounters and Academic Outcomes of International and Domestic Students in Four Canadian Universities. Journal of International Students, 4(3), 262–278. https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v4i3.466

Issue

Section

Research Articles