Do Chinese International Students’ Personalities Change During Cross-National Transitions?

  • Kenneth T. Wang Fuller Theological Seminary, United States
  • Lu Tian University of Northern Colorado, United States
  • Mayo Fujiki Ripley-Ohio-Dearborn Special Education Cooperative, United States
  • Jennifer J. Bordon University of Albany, United States
Keywords: perfectionism, international students, acculturative stress, self-esteem, cross-national, psychological symptoms, longitudinal

Abstract

Perfectionism is a multidimensional personality construct salient for international students; they are known to be likely high achievers in their home country and face several acculturative challenges after crossing national borders. This study examined whether perfectionist types changed during cross-national transitions in a sample of 227 Chinese international students studying in the U.S. Individuals were classified into different types of perfectionists—adaptive, maladaptive, and non- perfectionists. Results indicated that 40% of the participants’ perfectionist types changed during their cross-national transition. After studying in the United States, more non-perfectionists became perfectionists than perfectionists that turned into non-perfectionist. Acculturative stress predicted the direction of shift; nonperfectionists who perceived higher levels of acculturative stress were more likely to change into maladaptive perfectionists than adaptive perfectionists.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Metrics

Metrics Loading ...

Author Biographies

Kenneth T. Wang, Fuller Theological Seminary, United States

KENNETH T. WANG, PhD, is an Associate Professor in Clinical Psychology at Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA. Research interests include perfectionism, cross-cultural adjustment, and cultural psychology of religion. 

Lu Tian, University of Northern Colorado, United States

LU TIAN, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at Department of Applied Psychology and Counselor Education in University of Northern Colorado. Her teaching interests include multicultural counseling and psychological trauma. Her research interests include proactive coping and the effect of culture in coping behaviors. 

Mayo Fujiki, Ripley-Ohio-Dearborn Special Education Cooperative, United States

MAYO FUJIKI, PhD, is a School Psychologist at the Ripley-OhioDearborn Special Education Cooperative in Indiana. She received her PhD from the University of Missouri - Columbia. 

Jennifer J. Bordon, University of Albany, United States

JENNIFER J. BORDON, MA, is a doctoral student in Counseling Psychology at University at Albany, State University of New York. Research interests include Asian and Asian American mental health, cultural orientation, and ethnic identity. 

Published
2017-04-01
How to Cite
Wang, K. T., Tian, L., Fujiki, M., & Bordon, J. J. (2017). Do Chinese International Students’ Personalities Change During Cross-National Transitions?. Journal of International Students, 7(2), 229-245. Retrieved from https://www.ojed.org/index.php/jis/article/view/378
Section
Research Articles