Stress-Driven Spending: Correlates of International Students’ Adjustment Strains and Compulsive Online Buying

  • Yana Lou Auburn University, United States
  • Sang-Eun Byun University of South Carolina, United States
Keywords: adjustment strains, compulsive online buying, happiness, international students, self-esteem

Abstract

We investigated international students’ stress-driven spending behavior by focusing on the psychological and behavioral consequences of the strains they experience during the adjustment process in the U.S. We found that certain adjustment strains significantly lowered international students’ self esteem, which further affected their happiness and engagement in compulsive online buying. This study highlights the importance of understanding underlying drivers and consequences of international students’ adjustment strains to facilitate better adaptation to a foreign culture and to prevent negative consumption tendencies.

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Author Biographies

Yana Lou, Auburn University, United States

YANA LOU received a Master’s degree from the Department of Consumer and Design Sciences at Auburn University. Her major interests include international students’ adjustment problems and behaviors in a foreign country and the development of an e-platform for providing solutions and resources for the target population. 

Sang-Eun Byun, University of South Carolina, United States

SANG-EUN BYUN, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Retailing at University of South Carolina. Her major research interests lie in the area of consumer psychology and decision making, experiential retailing, corporate social responsibility, and retail industry analysis in the global context. 

Published
2018-10-01
How to Cite
Lou, Y., & Byun, S.-E. (2018). Stress-Driven Spending: Correlates of International Students’ Adjustment Strains and Compulsive Online Buying. Journal of International Students, 8(4), 1522–1548. https://doi.org/10.32674/jis.v8i4.214
Section
Research Articles