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  • Call for chapters--The Future of Remote and Hybrid Work in Global Higher Education: Perceptions, Policies, and Practices during COVID-19

    2022-06-23

    Book Project

    Title: The Future of Remote and Hybrid Work in Global Higher Education: Perceptions, Policies, and Practices during COVID-19

    Objective

    In 2021, the global COVID-19 lockdowns, restrictions, and vaccination requirements has caused tremendous shifts to the roles and responsibilities of faculty and staff members across generations. With very little preparation and coordination, colleges and universities around the world were forced to move their entire workforce off-campus and continue their operations in either a remote or hybrid environment.

    Today, as more institutions return to in-person work, many faculty and staff members are taking on new roles, responsibilities, and expectations during the global pandemic including online teaching and learning, using audio and video conferencing (e.g., Zoom, Microsoft Teams, Google Meet, Skype), as well as advising and mentoring students from a distance. In addition, the rapid rise of the Omicron variant and the demand to work fully remotely is causing significant concerns among many faculty and staff members worldwide amid the great resignation era.

    This book will explore the changing academic and student affairs professionals in global higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic. Postsecondary educational institutions must ensure they have adequate information and communications technology (and student support services) in place to adapt to the “new normal” post-2022. While many institutions have developed new remote and hybrid work policies or procedures on campus, limited research has been done to understand those impacts to faculty and staff members around the world. As a result, this book will examine the future of remote and hybrid work of faculty and staff.

    The target audience of this book will be teacher-scholars, policymakers, and administrators working in the area of faculty and staff preparation, human resources, and instructional design. The book also targets advanced practitioners and graduate students who intend to work remotely in colleges and universities, whether as Senior International Officers (SIO), academic program directors, or centers for teaching and learning. In the long run, this book seeks to inform institutional policy and strategy by working towards more culturally responsive teaching and learning to support academic and professional development. In the end, the book will serve as a tool for further discussion and reflection in faculty and staff development programs, future faculty and staff preparation workshops, as well as faculty and staff orientation programs. It is foreseeable that this book will become a much-referenced text for teacher-scholars and to individuals who work remotely in or with academic and students’ affairs professions.

    Rationale

    The outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic has forced people to shift to emergency remote working in many nations since early 2020, and this type of working style has become a new normal in workforce today. A report (Brynjolfsson et al., 2020) surveying a nationally-representative sample of the US population in two waves from April 1-5, 2020 and May 2-8, 2020 showed that of those employed pre-COVID-19, nearly half of them are now working from home, especially younger people. This national report further mentions that states with a higher share of employment in information work such as management, professional and related occupations were more likely to switch to remote work. Higher education has therefore been impacted by the pandemic as well, and many universities have shifted toward emergency remote work, that is from on campus face-to-face to digital teaching and learning formats. In other words, most universities have strictly followed the social distancing measures by implementing fully online courses and higher education professionals and staff working at home remotely since early 2020 worldwide. However, the instructors, university staff, and students have to meet new online teaching and learning challenges, such as demonstrating pedagogical skills in a fully online classroom, addressing the managerial role, establishing relationships with students, and providing technical support (Fatani, 2020).

    Furthermore, the COVID-19 pandemic can negatively impact individuals’ mental health and wellbeing. For example, a study surveying 1210 participants from 194 cities in China during the early 2020 showed that 54% of respondents rated psychological impact of the COVID-19 outbreak as moderate or severe; 29% reported moderate to severe anxiety symptoms; and 17% reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms (Wang et al., 2019). Specifically, scholars noted that the emergent transitioning to remote learning has impacted on the psychological health of students (Sahu, 2020). A high level of anxiety may be attributed to stressful circumstances related to the COVID-19 pandemic (Alqabbani et al, 2021). For instance, taking fully online courses along with learning/working from home may produce a feeling of isolation, disconnectedness, and lack of interaction, which would result in students’ loss of learning motivation, leading to a high dropout rate (Bolliger et al., 2010). The disconnections from classmates, instructors, friends, and partners may also lead to intense feelings including frustration, anxiety, loneliness, and isolation (Zhai & Du, 2020). Zhai and Du (2020) additionally stated that the remote learning/working may force some students to cease their research projects and internships, and such disruptions would jeopardize their programs of study, delay their graduation, and undermine their competitiveness on the job market, which in turn increase these students’ anxiety. Therefore, it is significant for universities to respond to the public health emergency, to continue developing courses of action and public health messaging to better address college students’ mental health issues. They proposed several recommendations, such as transitioning student advising to telecommunication, providing virtual office hours, offering alternative plans for students in terms of their research projects and internship, working on innovative methods to support students to move research projects and capstones forward in order to help them meet the graduation requirement, and providing virtue consulting services relate to career and mental health issues.

    Additionally, the pandemic and he sudden switch to remote work has affected faculty views toward the academic work environment and job satisfaction. One report (Course Hero, 2020) surveying more than 570 full- and part-time faculty members in the US showed that one major stress relates to the challenges transitioning to online teaching. Additionally, some faculty have experienced significant stress from frustration with the decisions of the institutional administration, personal matters (e.g., childcare, financial concerns), or other world events (e.g., election, social unrest). This report further indicated that college faculty have experienced an increasing emotional drain and work-related frustration, and more than 40% of them have considered leaving their positions due to the COVID-19 impacts.

    Specifically, the remote work has made the professional lives challenging for academic women with caring responsibilities, as stated “Trying to make it through daily life during COVID-19 is a narrative echoed by many women in academia” (Nash & Churchill, 2020, p. 834). Some academic women reported that they have to delay their tenure clock because they have to care for their young dependents at home (Kitchener, 2020). It is noted that the short-term reorganization care and work time during the pandemic may have a long-term impact on women’s academic careers (Minello, 2020). Moreover, anecdotal evidence showed that women are submitting fewer papers to peer-reviewed journals compared to men during the COVID-19 crisis (Kitchener, 2020). Some evidence include: an estimation a 50% drop in submission from women in the area of astrophysics, men’s submissions to a politics journal increased by more than 50%, submissions from male authors between March and April 2020 increased by 6.4% on arXiv whereas submission from women increased only 2.7% (Frederickson, 2020). In short, the COVID-19 pandemic forces families to make decisions regarding how they manage unpaid caring labor (Price, 2020), while this extra domestic labor is unsurprisingly falling to women, and thus exacerbating existing gender inequality (Nash & Churchill, 2020). Therefore, it is crucial for higher education institutions to develop strategies and policies to support academic women to manage remote work and caring responsibilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    In late 2020, as more schools have been preparing for reopening while waves of COVID-19 and related infections may spread rapidly and unexpectedly worldwide, hybrid learning—an emerging strategy of combing online and face-to-face teaching is considered as a promising option following the social distancing measure while supplement a lack of in-person contact (Skulmowski & Rey, 2019). Hybrid learning typically refers to a combination of real-life and digital teaching components (Moskal et al., 2003; Oliver & Trigwell, 2005). It is identified as an approach that includes the efficiency and socialization opportunities of face-to-face learning with the digitally enhanced learning of the online delivery (Dziuban et al., 2004). Therefore, this learning method has been considered as an optimal learning experience to students (Powell, 2021) because it may provide engaging learning opportunities to learners by combining face-to-face medium of instruction with online learning opportunities (Singh et al., 2021). Although hybrid learning is not new. Yet, the social distancing measure of COVID-19 has required universities to develop a more precise model to maximize interpersonal contact as permitted by social distancing regulations when using new and emerging technology (Skulmowski & Rey, 2020).

    Therefore, many universities worldwide have implemented hybrid learning in different formats. For example, one university in Romania integrated a hybrid system combining face-to-face interactions in seminars and labs along with online courses among first-year students. It is shown that students preferred face-to-face practical activities and enjoyed taking courses in an online manner. It seems that this approach becomes a bridge between the face-to-face and online education. Similarly, Mourtzis and colleagues (2021) presents a hybrid model consisted of digital labs and hybrid labs for engineering college students in Greece and stated that this approach would effectively against the spread of COVID-19 and also reduce students’ course dropout rate. Some scholars (Trivason et al., 2020) in a Thailand university proposed another hybrid classroom where some students attend the class face-to-face, while others take the class online. This hybrid classroom concept aims to reduce the number of involved people in each activity by offloading some group of people to online from their home. This approach also allows both physical and online attendees to interact during the course sessions. Hanaei et al. (2020) further stated that a hybrid approach would benefits both symptomatic participants but also for international participants for scientific events or conferences. They further proposed some emerging standards for this hybrid approach, such as performing risk assessment and mitigation, sanitizing venues and environment, and complying with World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for appropriate participants protection and disease prevention.

    As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to influence worldwide, it is unknown how long the remote or hybrid working style may last. Additionally, with multiple advantages and positive outcomes, it seems that in the future, higher education institutions may consider providing options between various forms of teaching without being constrained by reasons of a healthy emergency (Potra et al., 2021). Some scholars (Yan, 2020) stated that the COVID-19 pandemic may be an opportunity for change and innovation, as noted that “the COVID-19 crisis can be a time of major reform in higher education which will accelerate the process of digitalization in an unprecedented way” (Skulmowski & Rey, 2020, p. 212). Thus, it is necessary for higher educational institutions to ensure that they have adequate information, innovative technology, and students, faculty, and staff support services in place to adapt to the new normal. As a result, there is a call for examining the future of remote and hybrid work to better understand those impacts to faculty and staff members around the world.

    Target Audience

    In 2022, faculty and staff members worldwide are leaving the workforce in massive numbers amid the great resignation era. This book will explore the changing academic and student affairs professionals in global higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic. The target audience of this book will be teacher-scholars, policymakers, and administrators working in the area of faculty and staff preparation, human resources, and instructional design. The project also targets advanced practitioners and graduate students who intend to work remotely in colleges and universities, whether as Senior International Officers (SIO), academic program directors, or centers for teaching and learning. In the long run, this book seeks to inform institutional policy and strategy by working towards more culturally responsive teaching and learning to support academic and professional development. In the end, the book will serve as a tool for further discussion and reflection in faculty and staff development programs, future faculty and staff preparation workshops, as well as faculty and staff orientation programs. It is foreseeable that this book will become a much-referenced text for teacher-scholars and to individuals who work remotely in or with academic and students’ affairs professions.

    Tentative Timeline

    Full chapter due: August 1, 2022

    Reviewers assigned: August 15, 2022

    Reviews due: Sept. 15, 2022

    Response to review send out: Oct. 1, 2022

    Revised chapters back: Nov. 1, 2022

    Chapter due to publishers: Dec. 1, 2022

    Publisher

    Contributing Authors

    The editors will invite highly respected scholars and advanced graduate students from colleges and universities around the world, as well as highly regarded practitioners of education abroad who have published in this area to submit a chapter.

    Individual chapters are to be written in the style of concise scholarly essays of up to 5,000 words in length. Chapters will follow Palgrave Macmillan/Springer protocols and be original contributions that have not been published previously. All chapters will be peer-reviewed by experts in the international higher education field.

    Types of Contributions and Length

    The book welcomes both conceptual and empirical papers. Examples are:

    • Case studies: In-depth reports of international faculty and staff members’ workforce experience in the US institutions
    • Conceptual papers: Contributions synthesizing existing literature.
    • Full research papers: Both qualitative and quantitative studies that study a particular aspect of international faculty and staff members’ workforce experience in the US institutions

    Competing works

    • Felstead, A. (2022). Remote Working: A Research Overview. Routledge
    • Turner, J. G. (2021). The Pros and Cons of Online Learning in Higher Education. Writing Avenue.

     

    Table of Contents

    Section I: Shift towards remote and hybrid teaching and learning in global higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic

    • Effective strategies development for remote teaching and learning
    • Adaptation to emergency remote and/or hybrid teaching
    • Mental health and wellbeing of faculty and students
    • Challenge and opportunities of professional lives of faculty
    • Equity, diversity, inclusiveness, and community building in online classrooms

    Section II: Technology and digital communication in remote and hybrid work in postsecondary education institutions

    • Digital readiness and preparation of faculty, staff, and students in higher education setting
    • Development of innovative technology and digital communication for remote and/or hybrid teaching and learning
    • Assessment distance learning in higher education
    • Digital transformation of education
    • Development of digital literacy skills and/or competence

    Section III: Support for remote and hybrid working in tertiary education systems, policies, and procedures

    • Development of remote and flexible work policies
    • Remote adjust faculty and student success
    • Hybrid academic advisors and career coaches
    • Virtual student affairs practitioners and student development from a distance
    • Virtual senior international officers and study abroad practitioners in higher education

    Section VI: The future of remote and hybrid working during the global pandemic

    • Deigning for the new normal after COVID-19 pandemic
    • Cyber university concept and higher education post COVID-19 pandemic
    • Rethinking the roles and modes of higher education
    • Recovering higher education during and after the COVID-19 pandemic
    • Strategies of copying with future healthy emergency

    Section V: Special topics: Contemporary issues of remote and hybrid work in global higher education

    • Open topics

    Submission procedure

    Researchers, practitioners and administrators are invited to submit a proposal. There will be a two-stage review process. First, potential authors will be invited to submit a chapter proposal of 100~150 words as soon as possible explaining the mission and scope of the proposed chapter. The editors will review the abstracts to evaluation if the proposed chapter 1) fits the theme of the book, 2) makes a substantial contribution and 3) is of interest to the target audience. Authors will be notified as soon as possible about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Second, the selected authors will be invited to submit a full version of the proposed chapter. These chapters will be reviewed by a double-blind process. Based on the review process, the authors are asked to revise their chapters.

    Contact Information

    Roy Y. Chan, Ph.D.

    rchan@leeuniversity.edu

    Xi Lin, Ph.D.

    linxi18@ecu.edu

    Read more about Call for chapters--The Future of Remote and Hybrid Work in Global Higher Education: Perceptions, Policies, and Practices during COVID-19
  • International(-ised) Students in East and Southeast Asia: Critical Perspectives

    2022-04-13

    In this volume, we focus on East and South East Asia as the regions with the greatest diversity of transnational and international educational partnerships (Universities UK, 2021), and consequently with the greatest diversity of narratives around the students that take part in them. Moreover, it is becoming more and more apparent that regions such as China, Hong Kong, Singapore, and South Korea are amongst the rising powers and are eager global players in education, and whilst still being major sending countries, they are now also increasingly important student destinations.  Others in the region, like Brunei, may only begin to develop their transnational education, but have huge national investment behind it, so it will be very interesting to see what narratives around students emerge from these contexts. And now, the global Covid-19 pandemic, which bought the world to a stop in 2020-21and now specifically to the Eastern and Southeastern region where some regions have once again gone into full lock-down.  The physical movements of students in these regions have been stopped and stalled, but that does not mean that new forms of movement – virtual/ideational - have not been facilitated through transnational educational partnerships, using the new infrastructures that keep students moving whilst suspended in place. All this makes East and South East Asia an ideal context for the aims of this book (more) which are:

    1. To explore student counterflows to what we are used to in terms of traditional international student mobility caused by the specific international/transnational context of East and South East Asia
    2. To synthesise and critically evaluate new narratives about international/ transnational students and how they are associated with these counterflows
    3. To conceptualise a definition of an international (-ised) student, to invite readers to think with a phrase ‘international(-ised), and to evaluate the use of this phrase against more traditional student narratives 

    For questions, contact

     Dr Aneta Hayes: a.m.hayes@keele.ac.uk

    Dr Sihui Wang: s.wang@keele.ac.uk

    Read more about International(-ised) Students in East and Southeast Asia: Critical Perspectives
  • Call for chapters- The International Handbook of French Education

    2022-04-04

    This edited collection brings together the voices of French educators, supporters, students, educational leaders, and other stakeholders from around the globe to share their perspectives on the current value and future benefits of the teaching and learning of the French language and Francophone culture. French has been internationally prominent as a language of diplomacy, politics, cultural study, and education for centuries in many countries around the world. In contemporary times, millions if not billions of individuals speak French fluently as a first, second, third or other language. It also functions as a lingua franca for millions of individuals. Dually, there exists a plethora of K-12 French immersion schools and numerous colleges and universities that offer French courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels around the globe. 

    Read more about Call for chapters- The International Handbook of French Education
  • Call for Chapters || International students and higher education providers at the crossroads: Australian perspectives on transnational mobility

    2021-12-17

    This edited volume seeks to investigate, unveil and interrogate the lived experiences, challenges, and opportunities of international students in Australia and those of the host institutions. Through various methodological lenses such as case studies, narrative inquiry, ethnographic, autoethnographic, and mixed-method methodologies, particular attention is paid to international students’ academic journeys (e.g. social, cultural, and language experiences, understanding colloquial language, academic success, student motivation, and expectations, students’ academic literacies, identity construction, etc.), student wellbeing (e.g. feelings of isolation, experiences of rejection, homophobia, identity problems, etc.), equity and social justice in international education, international student employability, university intervention programs for international student support, university strategies for issues of academic integrity, and university contingencies for international student performance, retention, attrition, and satisfaction. For questions and submissions, contact--

    Dr. Leonardo Veliz, Head of School of Education, Excelsia College, Sydney, Australia

    Leonardo.veliz@excelsia.edu.au

    Read more about Call for Chapters || International students and higher education providers at the crossroads: Australian perspectives on transnational mobility
  • Call for Chapters - Millennial faculty in global higher education: Exploring the professoriate in the era of COVID-19

    2021-12-04

    Call for Book Chapter:  Millennial faculty in global higher education: Exploring the professoriate in the era of COVID-19 || Due- March 1, 2022

    The purpose of this book is to document the experience of millennial faculty in the United States and abroad, including their expertise and experiences in teaching, research, and academic transitions as young professoriate or scholars in tertiary institutions. The move from elite to mass higher education has witnessed the rise of millennials in the academic profession around the world. This book will investigate the support system and surroundings that help these young teacher-scholars and practitioners transition and integrate into academia. The sub-theme of this book will explore the typologies, characteristics and generation differences of faculty between Millennials and the previous generations (e.g., Gen X, Baby Boomers, and Silent Generation).The book will shed new light on understanding the contemporary global challenges and opportunities that arise with Millennial faculty members, as well as building research-based knowledge when mentoring and assisting these new professors for the academic profession in the era of COVID-19.  Check details here and submit your proposals /questions to Dr. Xi Lin (East Carolina University) at linxi18@ecu.edu or Dr. Roy Y. Chan (Lee University) at rchan@leeuniversity.edu

    Table of Contents (select one of the following suggested topics)

    Section I: Multigenerational Diversity in the Academic Workplace during COVID-19

    • Characteristics of Millennials and faculty roles
    • Millennial faculty’s culture and communication pedagogies
    • Millennials as digital natives
    • Millennials as transnational scholars

    Section II: Millennial Generation Expectation Gap in Global Higher Education

    • Millennial faculty’s expectations of communication
    • Millennial faculty’s expectations of work ethic
    • Collaboration and engagement among Millennial Faculty
    • Community-engaged scholarship among Millennial Faculty
    • Research performance and productivity among Millennial Faculty

    Section III: Mentoring and Faculty Development of Millennial Faculty

    • Campus support systems for Millennial faculty
    • The reverse mentoring at workplace
    • Recruitment and retainment of domestic and international Millennial faculty
    • Academic freedom, global citizenship, and civic engagement among Millennial faculty

    Section VI: COVID-19 Challenges and Opportunities of Millennial Faculty

    • Fostering cross-generational learning and developing Millennial leaders 
    • Generational influences in academia 
    • Developing the next generation of faculty post-COVID-19
    • Graduate employability of Millennials 
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  • Call for Chapter Proposals--Curriculum Theory and Pedagogy for Student Mobility: Research and Practice in International Higher Education

    2021-11-09

    The edited volume will bring together teaching research and practices that reveal how curricular and pedagogical change in institutions of higher education can promote academic success in the education of international students across diverse socio-political contexts. Possible areas of applicable curriculum theory to be addressed include (but are not limited to): Innovative curriculum-related theories, concepts, and practices in the teaching of international students; Curriculum theory research and practice by educators in multicultural educational landscapes; The application of cross-cultural and cross-racial teaching technologies in international student education; The framing, management, and assessment of experiential, co-curricular, and pre-professional opportunities, and programming for international students... more

    Key Dates: Abstracts (250 words max.) due: January 15, 2021 || completed chapters: April 31, 2022

    Please submit abstracts to Dr. Lin Ge at gelin200@uregina.ca

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  • Call for chapters: Online Teaching and Learning in Asian

    2021-11-06

    This book will provide an informative and critical review of online teaching and learning and recent innovative digital developments in Asian higher education. As a resource, this volume offers insights and perspectives of educators in online teaching and learning in Asia. The chapters will include scholarly reflections, conceptual papers, and research papers that draw on educators’ lessons learned from teaching during COVID-19, and effective practices that educators could draw on in 21st and 22nd centuries. this book will include innovations in online curriculum design; innovations in connecting with students; and innovations in assessments. Each section will include a collection of scholarly reflective practices, conceptual papers, and research papers. more

     For questions and proposals, please contact Dr. Misty Cook at elcmsw@nus.edu.sg

    Read more about Call for chapters: Online Teaching and Learning in Asian
  • Call for Chapters: Asian international students in Canadian universities

    2021-07-13

    This book explores how the recruitment and retention of Asian international students in Canadian universities intersect with other institutional priorities. The intent is to highlight how Canadian post-secondary education institutions frame their engagement with the Asian international student population in a context in which this group has become an increasingly important target and source of revenue (Zhou et al., 2017). Specifically, this book responds to the growing need for new insights and perspectives on the institutional mechanisms adopted by Canadian universities to support Asian international students in their academic and social integration to university life. The sub-theme that runs through this book relates to the challenges and limitations of framing the support to this diverse student group at the intersection of two institutional priorities – internationalization and anti-racism. This is especially important for this group, known to experience invisible forms of discrimination and differential treatment in Canadian post-secondary education institutions (Colomba, 2013). Topics in this book include international students’ experiences and understandings of race and racism, comparisons with domestic students and/or non-Asian students, institutional discourse and narratives on Asian international students, comparison with other university priorities, cross-national comparisons, best practices, and recent developments linked to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Editors: Ann H. Kim, Elizabeth Buckner and Jean Michel Montsion; Series/Publisher: Routledge Studies in Global Student Mobility

    Contact Information: Ann H. Kim, Ph.D. annkim@yorku.ca ; Elizabeth Buckner, Ph.D. elizabeth.buckner@utoronto.ca 

     

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  • Forthcoming book: Chinese STEM PhD Students Abroad: Negotiating across worlds

    2021-07-13

    Chinese STEM PhD Students Abroad invites readers to enter the worlds of Chinese international doctoral students (CIDS) in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). With an endeavor to reveal heterogeneity as well as commonality, this book examines their diverse and challenging experiences and how they negotiate transitions across borders between their research, personal and social worlds to achieve success over time. This book will be of special interest to doctoral supervisors, researchers, student counselors, tertiary administrators, and policymakers, east or west; and it should also be of interest to Chinese students who are doing or expect to commence a PhD abroad.

    Author names: Yibo Yang & Judith MacCallum; Series/Publisher: Routledge Studies on Global Student Mobility Series (Bista & Glass)

    (This is book is not accepting proposals)

    Read more about Forthcoming book: Chinese STEM PhD Students Abroad: Negotiating across worlds
  • Call for Chapters: Home and Abroad: International Student Experiences and Graduate Employability

    2021-07-13

    This book highlights the theoretical and practical aspects of international student employability. This includes, but is not limited to, the following areas related to international student employability:

    • International student expectations and challenges with employability
    • University-industry linkages that enhance student employability
    • Perceptions from different stakeholders on employability, including academics, university careers services, alumni, local and international employers, and so on
    • Theoretical contributions on employability in a globalized society  
    • Evaluation of recent initiatives implemented to facilitate the holistic career development of students
    • Pedagogical research or curriculum development studies on enhancing international student employability

    Editors

    Dr Xin (Skye) Zhao, University of Sheffield, xin.zhao@sheffield.ac.uk; Dr Michael Kung, University of Florida, mkung@dcp.ufl.edu ; Dr Yingyi Ma, Syracuse University, yma03@syr.edu; Dr Krishna Bista, Morgan State University, krishna.bista@morgan.edu

    Series/Publisher: STAR Scholars Network

    (accepting proposals)

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  • Call for Proposal/Advisory Board Members

    2021-04-25

    The STAR Scholars Book Series seeks to explore new ideas and best practices related to international student mobility, study abroad, exchange programs, student affairs from the US and around the world, and from a wide range of academic fields, including student affairs, international education, and cultural studies.

    How to submit a proposal for a new book or a chapter?

    Scholars interested in contributing a chapter to a book in our current and future book series or sending us a new book proposal are invited to submit a brief proposal directly via this form or directly to the title editors (not the series editors). All selected proposals will be invited to write full chapters by the editors. All chapters will go through the standard review process before a decision is made.

    Submit your proposal for consideration.

    Interested in serving on the advisory board, please complete this form

    Read more about Call for Proposal/Advisory Board Members